Last edited by Vijar
Wednesday, May 13, 2020 | History

6 edition of The Life of Christina Mirabilis found in the catalog.

The Life of Christina Mirabilis

by Thomas de Cantimpre

  • 94 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Cistercian Publications/Peregrina Publishing .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Christina, Mirabilis, Saint, 1150-1224,
  • Women mystics

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsMargot H. King (Translator)
    The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages58
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8353638M
    ISBN 100920669018
    ISBN 109780920669013

      Elizabeth of Spalbeek, Christina Mirabilis, and Marie d'Oignies were three of the famous late twelfth-/early thirteenth-century 'holy women' from the region of Brabant and Liege: their life stories (written in Latin by Philip of Clairvaux, Thomas of Cantimpre, and Jacques of Vitry) were read throughout later medieval Europe, and Margery Kempe modelled her Book, Pages: Her example of female courage and outspokenness clearly appealed to her namesake Christine de Pisan, for one, who retold Christina's legend and claimed her as both patron and model in Part 3 of the Book of the City of Ladies (). Nor was it only to women that late-medieval readers applied Christina's example.

    Few details are known of St. Christina but she lived during the third century and was the daughter of a rich and powerful magistrate believed to have been named Urbain. He was deep in the practices of heathenism and had a number of golden idols, which he . In , Thomas of Cantimpré wrote his Life of Christina Mirabilis (c. –), an account of the miraculous life and three deaths of an unenclosed holy woman from the Low Countries.

    - Feast Day - July 24 th Mentally ill and Therapists. See more ideas about Saints, Patron saints and Catholic pins. St. Elisabeth of Sch�nau (; Germany): Visions -- Book Two: Notes: New Styles of Feminine Spirituality -- the Beguine Movement: Marie D'Oignies, Christina Mirabilis, Hadewijch of Brabant, and Beatrijs of Nazareth: Notes: Marie D'Oignies (; Brabant-Flanders): The Life of Marie D'Oignies, by Jacques De Vitry.


Share this book
You might also like
The warriors apprentice

The warriors apprentice

Women in Frankish society

Women in Frankish society

21st century leadership

21st century leadership

Hooked

Hooked

Spotty Zebra

Spotty Zebra

Reference books.

Reference books.

Positive pathways

Positive pathways

Social psychology issues and insights

Social psychology issues and insights

U.S. and Canadian electric utility installed base report.

U.S. and Canadian electric utility installed base report.

Fundamentals of Nursing + Dosage Calculations

Fundamentals of Nursing + Dosage Calculations

The secular abyss

The secular abyss

Library of Native Americans

Library of Native Americans

1986 Papermakers Conference

1986 Papermakers Conference

Rodin: bronzes and drawings

Rodin: bronzes and drawings

So special

So special

The Life of Christina Mirabilis by Thomas de Cantimpre Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Life of Christina Mirabilis 2nd Edition by Thomas De Cantimpre (Author), Margot H. King (Author) out of 5 stars 3 ratings. ISBN ISBN Why is ISBN important.

ISBN. This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. 5/5(3).

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle.

All (or virtually all) other information based on Christina is based off this book. It is astonishing, fo sho. One of my absolute favorites, of all time, and a valuable addition to anyone's library who is interested in studying the saints/5.

The life of Christina Mirabilis. Thomas (de Cantimpré), Margot H. King. Peregrina Pub. Co., Oct 1, - Biography & Autobiography - 54 pages.

0 Reviews. From inside the book. What people are saying - Write a review. We haven't found any reviews in the usual places. Contents. Section 1. 9: Section 2. Section 3. This is a fine edition and translation of the original life of Christina Mirabilis. It is sad that it is out of print, as I try to teach it as often as I can in my university Medieval Lit.

classes. I am hoping that the editor and publisher, or other entities, will bring this book back into print.5/5. St. Christina the Astonishing Christina Mirabilis Virgin, A.D. Feast day: July 24th Christina's Life The earliest account of the life of St.

Christina the Astonishing comes to us courtesy of the 13th century Dominican, Thomas de Cantimpré1, who wrote the lives of several holy men and women from the diocese of Liége. Saint Christina the Astonishing (Mirabilis) prayer card from (via Wikimedia Commons) Blogs | Sep.

18, A reimagining of the life of Christina the Astonishing is not so much secular as. I know of no other saint that is called “astonishing.” But if anyone deserves this title, it is St. Christina. Christina Mirabilis was born in Belgium, sometime during the year She was the youngest of three daughters, and her parents were devoutly religious people.

Christina and her sisters lost their parents when Christina was only So, Christina the Astonishing is sort of a saint. She lived in the late 12th century and early 13th century, right around the time the Church was forming the modern canonization process, and she’s never been been formally canonized.

Nonetheless, she was popularly considered a saint for centuries after her death. Her relics have been preserved, she was included in a version of.

St. Christina Mirabilis, Vita (in Latin; the English translation is a copyrighted book & isn’t free) St. Christina the Astonishing. A scholarly essay about St. Christina (partly about the spiritual / physical divide in the legend) Butler’s Lives of.

Compare book prices from overbooksellers. Find The Life of Christina Mirabilis () by De Cantimpre, Thomas;/5(27). Christina Mirabilis, the Impossible, the Alone and Apart. Christina the Astonishing, my sister, I entreat you. ♦ Published in the print edition of the J: Kirstin Valdez Quade.

Thomas de Cantimpré: The Life of Christina Mirabilis, in Latin, [At Peregrina Press's Matrologia Latina site] Theodoric of St. Eucharius. Discovery of the Relics of St. Celsus in Trier in. Also known as. Christina Mirabilis; Christine the Admirable; Memorial.

24 July; Profile. Born to a peasant family, orphaned as a child, and raised by two older she experienced a severe seizure of what may have been was so severe as to be cateleptic, and she was thought to have her funeral Mass, she suddenly recovered, and levitated to the.

found: Book of Saints (Christina the Astonishing (Mirabilis), ; born near Liége, Belgium; in after a cataleptic fit she was the subject of a life-long series of most astonishing experiences, recorded by a Dominican contemporary; died at. Life or death: what does one choose.

Most people would agree to remain alive without much hesitation. In the case of Medieval Mystic Christina of Mirabilis, Christina also makes the hasty decision to continue living on Earth hoping to appease God even though her decision ultimately leads Christina to push her body to terrifying limits.

Three Women of Liège: A Critical Edition of and Commentary on the Middle English Lives of Elizabeth of Spalbeek, Christina Mirabilis, and Marie d'Oignies.

Abstract: Elizabeth of Spalbeek, Christina Mirabilis, and Marie d'Oignies were three of the famous late twelfth-/early thirteenth-century 'holy women' from the region of Brabant and Liège: their life stories (written in Latin by Philip of Clairvaux, Thomas of Cantimpré, and Jacques of Vitry) were read throughout later medieval Europe, and Margery Kempe modelled her Book, and her life.

On a human level, Christina may have seemed unusual, but she lived to please God, not men. This is the calling of each of us: to love God with all our heart, mind, soul and strength, and love one another as we love ourselves. Prayer. Christina, you lived a life of poverty and loneliness in the eyes of others.

Christina, the patron of both the mentally ill and therapists, embarked on a life of extreme behavior. She became homeless, dressed in rags, begging for food.

During intense prayer, she threw herself into fiery furnaces or into the frozen river for days, emerging unscathed. “Christina the Astonishing ( – )” What fascinated me was the presence of the sacred, the religious amidst life. I read a book review in The New Yorker recently, of a piece of semi-fiction by a French writer who had at one time been devoutly religious for a spell, and either it discussed or I extrapolated from it the opposition.The Life of Marie d’Oignies, last in this triad of holy women in MS Doucechallenges the reader expecting Marie to seem vastly more conventional than Elizabeth of Spalbeek and Christiana Mirabilis.

Certainly, Marie was more widely known than Elizabeth or Christina (as is evident from Margery Kempe’s refer-ences to Marie), and her vita.Christina the Astonishing is her usual name in English only; her common Latin name is Christina Mirabilis, which we can translate as Christina the Miraculous – much clearer.

Christina was born around into a non-Christian family, the youngest of three daughters. After being orphaned at the age of 15, she worked taking herds to pasture.